ITINERARY DETAILS

1st Day of Journey:

  • Upon arrival assistance and guidance at Jeddah Airport.
  • After immigration we will then set off to the city of Makkah by coach/bus with the group.
  • Check in Makkah Hotel
  • Perform Umrah with the Group leader/Staff

Staying in Makkah till 19th Ramadan:

  • 1st till 19th Ramadan staying in Makkah hotel, take the advantage and spend most of the time in ibadat inside Masjid-Haram.
  • Ziyarat of historical places in Makkah will be arranged with the group after Fajar/Asr Salah (Group leader will inform the customers in advance).
  • Food (Sahoor & Iftar) will be served at hotel during the stay in Makkah.

20th Day of Ramadan:

  • We will check out from Makkah hotel around 13:00pm (local time).
  • We depart to the city of Madinah by coach/bus with the group.
  • Check in Madinah hotel around 18:00pm (local time).

Staying in Madinah:

  • Staying in Madinah hotel from 20th Ramadan till 1st day of EID and spend most of your time in the Ibadat inside Masjid-Nabwi.
  • Ziyarat of historical places in Makkah will be arranged with the group after Fajar/Asr Salah (Group leader will inform the customers in advance).
  • Food (Sahoor & Iftar) will be served at hotel during the stay in Madinah

1st day of EID:

  • Offer EID salah in Masjid Nabwi.
  • Special breakfast will be served on the EID day.
  • Group will check out from the hotel around 13:00 pm (local time).
  • We will return to the airport by coach/bus with the group leader to take the flight back home.

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Ziyarat Of Al-Aqsa

The Qibly mosque (Masjid al-Aqsa) المسجد الاقصى

The structure with the silver/grey dome at the front of Masjid al-Aqsa is known as the ‘Qibly’ masjid (mosque) as it is located nearest to the Qiblah, the direction of prayer. The front of Masjid al-Aqsa is aligned directly towards the Ka’bah in Makkah.

Great virtue of praying in Masjid al-Aqsa: Abu Darda (رضي الله عنه) relates that the Prophet (صَلَّى اللّٰهُ عَلَيْهِ وَسَلَّم) said, “A prayer in Makkah is worth 100,000 times, a prayer in my Masjid (Madina) is worth 1,000 times, and a prayer in al-Aqsa is worth 500 times more than anywhere else”. [Al-Tabarani, al-Bayhaqi and al-Suyuti]

Masjid al-Aqsa is not only the Qibly mosque (with the silver/black dome) or the Dome of the Rock. It is in fact the whole region highlighted above and is also known as Bayt al-Maqdis or Bayt al-Muqaddas (House of the Holiness). The name ‘Masjid al-Aqsa’ translates as ‘the farthest mosque’ and is the third most holy place in Islam. It was here that in around 621 CE the Prophet Muhammed (صَلَّى اللّٰهُ عَلَيْهِ وَسَلَّم) came on the night journey from Makkah riding on the Buraq.

Masjid al-Aqsa is no ordinary masjid. The Prophet (صَلَّى اللّٰهُ عَلَيْهِ وَسَلَّم) dedicated a great deal of his life nurturing the Sahabah (Companions) to appreciate the excellent qualities of Masjid al-Aqsa. Some of the reasons why Masjid al-Aqsa should form an important aspect of a believer’s dedication is that it is:

  • The first qiblah for Muslims;
  • The station of al-Isra and al-Mi’raj;
  • The second house of Allah built on earth;
  • The place where hundreds of Messengers of Allah (سبحانه وتعالى) are buried;
  • The place where many Sahabah are buried;
  • A place where miracles were shown by Allah’s will;
  • A place which Allah (سبحانه وتعالى) Himself calls a ‘blessed place’;
  • Referred to directly and indirectly, 70 times in the Quran;
  • The place where angels have descended with Allah’s message;
  • The only place on earth where all the Messengers of Allah prayed at the same time led by the Prophet Muhammed (صَلَّى اللّٰهُ عَلَيْهِ وَسَلَّم)
  • The only Masjid mentioned by name in the Quran apart from the Ka’bah

Mihrab and Mimbar of Masjid al-Aqsa

This marble structure is the mihrab (prayer niche) of the Qibly mosque which is at the front of Masjid al-Aqsa. The mimbar (pulpit) on the right was donated by the Jordanian government after the original (which was a gift from Salahuddin Ayyubi) was destroyed in a fire.

Mihrab-e-Zakariyyah

he Mihrab-e-Zakariyya is a small prayer niche located in the eastern part of Masjid al-Qibly. It was built to commemorate the Prophet Zakariyyah (عليه السلام) who was a custodian of the Sacred Sanctuary (Masjid al-Aqsa).

Basement of Masjid al-Aqsa

This is a view underneath the Qibly mosque in the Masjid al-Aqsa platform. The stone pillars are believed by some to have been erected by jinnat in the time of Prophet Sulaiman (عليه السلام).

In Surah Saba’ of the Quran, Allah (سبحانه وتعالى) mentions: “There were jinn that worked under his supervision by the leave of his Lord, and if any of them deviated from Our command, We made him taste of the Penalty of Blazing Fire. They worked for him as he desired, (making) arches, statues, basins as large as reservoirs, and (cooking) cauldrons fived (in their places): ‘Work , family of Dawud, with thanks! But few of My slaves are grateful!” [34:12-13]

Entrance to the library underneath Masjid al-Aqsa,

The basement also houses a library containing around 130,000 books. There are also some 4,000 manuscripts, which were donated from the private collections of Jerusalem families. UNESCO says the library contains “one of the world’s most important collections of Islamic manuscripts”.

Marwan-e-Masjid

This praying area, which is underground and on the south-east side of the al-Aqsa compound is the Marwan-e-Masjid and has recently been restored. When the Crusaders had control of the mosque they used to use this area as stables for their horses and it became known as Solomon’s stables.

  • Although known traditionally as ‘Solomon’s stables’, the original building is unlikely to date as far back as Prophet Sulaiman (عليه السلام) and can more plausibly be attributed to Herod the Great who substantially extended the Temple Mount platform during his reign.
  • Islamic tradition credits a caliph named Marwan who transformed this area of the vaults into a series of usable rooms.
  • Marwan-e-Masjid is also known as Musallah Marwani.

Masjid al-Buraq

This small structure, on the south-west corner of the al aqsa compound is believed to be the place where the Prophet Muhammed (صَلَّى اللّٰهُ عَلَيْهِ وَسَلَّم) tied the Buraq, the winged riding animal upon which he rode during the Night of Ascension.

Buraq wall (Western/Wailing wall)

This wall, formerly referred to as the ‘Wailing Wall’ and now more commonly known as the ‘Western Wall’ is the most sacred place for Jews who believe it to be the only surviving structure of the Herodian temple. For Muslims it is known as the Buraq Wall, for on the other side is where the Prophet Muhammed (صَلَّى اللّٰهُ عَلَيْهِ وَسَلَّم) tied the Buraq, the riding animal upon which he rode during the Night of Ascension (Mi’raj).

The Dome of the Rock

The Dome of the Rock (Qubbatus Saqqara) is often mistakenly referred to as the al-Aqsa mosque but is actually part of Masjid al-Aqsa. This structure was built by Caliph Abd al-Malik from 688 to 691 CE and houses the sacred rock from which it is said the Prophet Muhammed (صَلَّى اللّٰهُ عَلَيْهِ وَسَلَّم) ascended to heaven (Mi’raj) after the night journey to Jerusalem (Isra’).

Interior of the Dome of the Rock

This rock is believed to be the place from where the Prophet Muhammed (صَلَّى اللّٰهُ عَلَيْهِ وَسَلَّم) ascended to heaven (mi’raj) during his night journey to Jerusalem. It is the opinion of some scholars that the angel Israfeel (عليه السلام) will blow the soor (trumpet) from this place to herald the Day of Judgement.

Underneath the Dome of the Rock

This is the small cave underneath the Dome of the Rock. The small mehrab on the left shows the direction of the Qiblah (i.e. the direction of Makkah).

  • This cave has been called ‘The Well of Souls’ (Arabic: Bir el-Arweh).

Dome of the Chain

The Dome of the Chain is located to the east of the Dome of the Rock and marks the exact centre of Masjid al-Aqsa.

The Dome of the Chain was built by the Umayyad Caliph Abdul Malik bin Marwan in 691 CE. It is also known as Qubbat al-Silsillah.

Spot where Prophet Sulaiman died

This building, located at the rear end of the Aqsa platform is believed to be the place where the Prophet Sulaiman (عليه السلام) passed away while leaning on his staff. It presently functions as a girls school.

Moroccan Gate (Bab al-Magharib)

This gate, along the western wall of Masjid al-Aqsa, is known as the Moroccan Gate. It was named after the residents in the adjacent neighbourhood, who after the conquest by Salahuddin Ayyubi had come to live in Jerusalem from Morocco. The gate is also known as the ‘Gate of the Moors’.

Cotton Merchants Gate (Bab al-Qattanin)

The Cotton Merchants Gate, also known as ‘Bab al-Qattanin’, is one of the most beautiful gates which leads into Masjid al-Aqsa from the western side. It was built by the Mamluk Sultan Muhammad bin Qaloun in 737 CE.

The name is derived from the fact that the gate leads out to the Cotton Market in the Old City of Jerusalem.

Madressa al-Uthmaniya

Adressa al-Uthmaniya is located on the western wall of Masjid al-Aqsa, between the door of Suq al-Qattanin and Madressa al-Ashrafiyya. The madressa (school) was funded and built by Isfahan Shah Khatun, a princess of the Ottoman dynasty. The building is distinctive due to it’s double window surmounted by two circular medallions and a rose window.

Madressa al-Isardiyyah

At the northern end of the Masjid al-Aqsa platform is Madressa al-Isardiyyah. This school was built by Majd ad-Din al-Is’ari, a merchant from Turkey. It is unique within Jerusalem as it has a mihrab (prayer niche) which juts out from the facade above the portico.

Madressa al-Ashrafiyah

The Madressa al-Ashrafiyah was a religious school founded in 1482 CE during the reign of Sultan Qaitbay. He established many religious foundations in various holy cities of Islam.

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